Fair of Face

Ok, so this photo may or may not have been taken over a year ago. In my defence: #TBT. Or #TBM. Whatever. Still, this remains one of my most treasured moments from our trip to Kenya. Clich├ęd as it may sound - we were about to turn back, on our very, very last safari, when… Continue reading Fair of Face

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The Internet and Nature: How I Got Here

So, on Thursday I gave a TED talk. It was about this blog. And it was about birds. And it was about... well, it was about a lot of things. Mostly it was about the Internet, and nature, and what happens, has happened, and will happen, between them - for better or worse. And I… Continue reading The Internet and Nature: How I Got Here

Journal Journeys: Face of the Maasai

An excerpt from the journal of my cousin, Preetu (a fantastic writer who gives herself far less credit than she deserves*), about her experience in the Maasai village we visited in Africa to accompany rare evidence of my forays into portraiture. "I remember, as a child, opening up on of those massive geography encyclopaedia things.… Continue reading Journal Journeys: Face of the Maasai

Dwarfish

There are two species of mongoose regularly seen on the Maasai Mara. The more common is the banded mongoose, but the dwarf mongoose - a small African carnivore found in groups of 15 or less - is also spotted, though less frequently. I expected to leave Kenya with that added to my list of 'what… Continue reading Dwarfish

Of Paintings and Project Noah

Some of you may recall my recent post of a lilac-breasted roller we spotted in Kenya. If you don't, refresh your memory. This bird was at the top of my to-see list in Kenya, not despite and in fact because it was so common there. Satisfaction guaranteed. (I also had a second, non-official list, which… Continue reading Of Paintings and Project Noah

Solitary Spoonbill

An African Spoonbill rests on the banks of Lake Nakuru in Kenya. This lake was formerly famous for its migratory flamingos; however, when heavy rainfall skewed the salinity balance that had been its primary attracting feature, yearly numbers decreased as the pink birds moved north. Nevertheless, the reserve centered on the water body is home… Continue reading Solitary Spoonbill

Bustard

One of the most endangered birds in the world is the Great Indian Bustard, which also happens to be one of the heaviest flying birds. Found in India and Pakistan, it is critically endangered on the IUCN Red List with a population that could be as low as 250 individuals. Its counterpart in Africa is… Continue reading Bustard

Little in Green

A Little Bee-eater (Merops pusillus) perches on a branch on the banks of the Mara River. Little Bee-eaters should not be confused with Little Green Bee-eaters (Merops orientalis); they are both two very distinct species - the Little Bee-eater is largely restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa with the more common Little Green Bee-eaterm found in areas… Continue reading Little in Green

2014

We have come to the end - of an era, maybe not, but of a rotation around the sun, of the usage of 2-0-1-4 in dates, of - well, really, nothing. Still, it's as good a time as any to round up what I've done and figure out where I'm going. No doubt you've been… Continue reading 2014

Savannah

The African lion is perhaps the most overly romanticized and/or brutalized animal on the Masai Mara. The classically shaggy mane of hair gracing the males is instantly recognizable. While it is true that in fact female lions are the primary hunters for the pride, male lions are often relied on for sheer brute force. Infanticide… Continue reading Savannah